FDA working to phase out Use of certain Antibiotics to make Food-producing Animals gain Weight

Will the FDA’s 2013 Antibiotic Guidance clean up Farming?

A long waited step to preserve the effectiveness of antibiotics drugs critical to human health.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is implementing a voluntary plan with industry to phase out the use of certain antibiotics for enhanced food production.

Some farmers have been exploiting antibiotics by adding to the animal feed or drinking water of cattle, hogs, poultry and other food-producing animals to help them gain weight faster or use less food to gain weight.

Because all uses of antimicrobial drugs, in both humans and animals, contribute to the development of antimicrobial resistance, it is important to use these drugs only when medically necessary. Governments around the world consider antimicrobial-resistant bacteria a major threat to public health. Illnesses caused by drug-resistant strains of bacteria are more likely to be potentially fatal when the medicines used to treat them are rendered less effective.

The FDA’s actions will limit the medications to their original purpose — to treat infections — and require veterinarians to dispense the drugs.

FDA Consumer Update:

Phasing Out Certain Antibiotic Use in Farm Animals
U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Dec. 11, 2013

Media Press Releases:

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Antibiotics, Arsenic, Diseases and Human Drugs in your Turkey for Thanksgiving

Turkey at $1.38 a pound sounds great, until you know what that means…

Prozac, Arsenic and Beer in Your Turkey? 9 Creepy Things To Know About Your Holiday Meal
Martha Rosenberg confirms that the extreme production methods used to deliver plump turkeys in time for Thanksgiving are enough to make you lose your appetite: with Antibiotics, Arsenic, Diseases and Human Drugs in it…

Regarding U.S. turkey growers, we asked you: “do you know why our modern super turkeys cannot mate?” and warned you about turkey farmers once using the DES hormone for faster growth. Martha Rosenberg confirms that the extreme production methods used to deliver plump turkeys in time for Thanksgiving are enough to make you lose your appetite:

  • Antibiotics
  • Arsenic and Other Feed Additives
  • Clostridium difficile or “C Diff”
  • Human Drugs…and Drinks
  • Resistant Salmonella and Other Superbugs
  • Diseases From Fast Growth Production
  • Degraded Meat Quality From Fast Growth Production
  • Extreme Cruelty To Animals
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How Drugs pumped into SuperMarket Chickens pose a terrifying Threat to our Health

Chicks are “vaccinated” as soon as their eggs are laid and before they even hatch

How Drugs pumped into SuperMarket Chickens pose a terrifying Threat to our Health
Scientists are particularly concerned that the overuse of a certain type of antibiotic is linked to a drug resistant strain of E. Coli

Today, large-scale poultry production has precious little to do with green fields and ruddy-cheeked farmers. Every year, more than 40 billion chickens are slaughtered worldwide for meat, the vast majority of them intensively factory-farmed.

They are often also dosed up with antibiotics — a preventative measure that is easier and cheaper than dealing with individual illnesses at a later date. Now experts are warning that the overuse of antibiotics in poultry farms around the world is creating a generation of superbugs that are resistant to treatment by virtually every drug in the medical establishment’s armoury.

With up to 80 per cent of the raw chicken on sale in some countries carrying these resistant bacteria, they can be transferred to humans during the handling of infected meat or the eating of undercooked produce.

Read How drugs pumped into supermarket chickens pose a terrifying threat to our health
by Tom Rawstorne, London Daily Mail, 10 August 2013.

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Dangerous SuperBugs increase in 42 States: a Nightmare Bacteria and major Threat emerging in US Hospitals?

Hospital Superbugs: New Report Shows Alarming Increase In Antibiotic-Resistant Germs

Hospital Superbugs: New Report Shows Alarming Increase In Antibiotic-Resistant GermsHealth officials are reporting an alarming increase in some dangerous superbugs at U.S. hospitals … … These superbugs from a common germ family have become extremely resistant to treatment with antibiotics.”

Read Superbugs threaten hospital patients, cdc, March 3, 2016 – Drug-Resistant Superbugs Kill At Least 23,000 People in the U.S. Each Year, scientificamerican, September 16, 2013.

The FDA keeps easing Regulations despite the Public Health Risk of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

The rise of Big Meat-bred super bugsPlease can someone remind me what the FDA ‘s role and responsibilities are?

The Food and Drug Administration is once again failing at protecting public health … !!! Simply shocking !!!

Read The rise of Big Meat-bred super bugs by Martha Rosenberg

The Rise of Big Meat-bred super Bugs

2012 was bringing bad news for people who don’t want “free antibiotics” in their food

The rise of Big Meat-bred super bugs

Despite the public health risk of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, the lobbyist-swayed FDA keeps easing regulations

!!!! Simply shocking …!
The FDA is once again failing at protecting public health … Please can someone remind me what the FDA’s role and responsibilities are?

Read The rise of Big Meat-bred super bugs
by Martha Rosenberg, Jan 31, 2012.

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The FDA and Enrofloxacin

FDA Denies Petition to Ban Certain Antibiotics

FDA Denies Petition to Ban Certain Antibiotics

To the dismay of consumer and sustainable agriculture advocates, the Food and Drug Administration rejected two petitions to ban certain antibiotics from being used in food animal production.

In its response to the Center for Science in the Public Interest, the FDA cited the withdrawal of diethylstilbestrol DES in 1979, which took a full seven years to complete, and the withdrawal of enrofloxacin in poultry, which took almost five years and cost FDA approximately $3.3 million. Read more : ” FDA Denies Petition to Ban Certain Antibiotics “.

FDA and Antibiotics

FDA cannot withdraw approval of a new animal drug until the legally-mandated process is complete

FDA Denies Petition to Ban Certain AntibioticsIn its response to CSPI, the FDA cited the withdrawal of Diethylstilbestrol DES in 1979, which took a full seven years to complete, and the withdrawal of enrofloxacin in poultry, which took almost five years and cost FDA approximately $3.3 million.

Read FDA Denies Petition to Ban Certain Antibiotics
BY HELENA BOTTEMILLER | NOVEMBER 10, 2011