The Yellow Card Scheme: reporting Medicine Side Effects

Member Of Public YellowCard Information Presentation

YellowCard Information Presentation

DES Daughter Network on SlideShare

Read Report Online suspected Side Effects to Medicine Drugs with @MHRApress UK Yellow Card Scheme #MHRA

Report Online suspected Side Effects to Medicine with the MHRA Yellow Card Scheme

The Yellow Card Scheme is the main adverse drug reactions reporting scheme in the UK

The Yellow Card Scheme:  Reporting Medicine Side Effects
You can report suspected side effects to a medicine, vaccine, herbal or complementary remedy – online

The MHRA and the Commission on Human Medicines (CHM) run the UK’s spontaneous adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting scheme – called the Yellow Card Scheme. This receives reports of suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) or side effects from healthcare professionals and patients for medicines and vaccines.

The Yellow Card Scheme is the main ADR reporting scheme in the UK and was introduced in 1964 after the thalidomide tragedy highlighted the urgent need for routine monitoring of medicines. It receives about 25,000 reports of possible side effects each year.

Find more information:

August 2013 FACSaware Peaceful Protest at London

Video by emma friedmann, published on 06 Aug 2013

FACSaware aims to raising global awareness of Fetal Anti Convulsant Syndromes and other teratogen-related syndromes. The Fetal AntiConvulsant Trust (F.A.C.T.) was set up in 2011 to campaign for responsibility from the government and drug company.

  • Video by emma friedmann, published on 06 Aug 2013
    • photos
    • poor regulations consequences
    • wish list for MHRA
  • Visit the FACS website and Twitter

Related posts:

Epilepsy: MHRA Drug Safety Update vol7

Topiramate, Valproate Special reminder on risk of neurodevelopmental delay in children following maternal use—not for use in pregnancy

AntiEpileptic Drugs

New advice on switching between different manufacturers’ products for a particular drug

Drug Safety Update vol7,monthly newsletter by the MHRA
Medicines safety updates from the MHRA, listing medicines information and safety alerts

Different antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) vary considerably in their characteristics, which influences the risk of whether switching between different manufacturers’ products of a particular drug may cause adverse effects or loss of seizure control. AEDs have been divided into three risk-based categories to help healthcare professionals decide whether it is necessary to maintain continuity of supply of a specific manufacturer’s product. Read more via the PDF link below.

Sodium Valproate

Special reminder on risk of neurodevelopmental delay in children following maternal use—not for use in pregnancy

There is new evidence on neurodevelopmental delay in children following maternal use of sodium valproate. A European review is underway to evaluate all currently available evidence on the association between fetal valproate exposure and neurodevelopmental delay or autism spectrum disorder. Healthcare professionals are reminded that sodium valproate should not be used during pregnancy and in women of childbearing potential unless clearly necessary. Read more via the PDF link below.

Full PDF; read and download the MHRA monthly newsletter
Drug Safety Update November 2013 (Volume 7, Issue 4)

For Related Posts, see our Tags:
AEDs – Epilepsy – Drugs – Pregnancy – Topiramate – Valproate

Epilim Sodium Valproate in Pregnancy

BBC1 Interview with Emma Friedmann of FACSaware

BBC1 East Midlands talks to Emma Friedmann, FACSaware, about the Flawed Warning System and the MHRA Protest

  • Video by jocozens1, Published on 31 Jul 2013
  • FACSaware aims to raising global awareness of Fetal Anti Convulsant Syndromes and other Teratogen related syndromes. The Fetal AntiConvulsant Trust (F.A.C.T.) was set up in 2011 to campaign for responsibility from the government and drug company.

Related posts:

The Truth about Pills and Pregnancy

With BBC Panorama Reporter Shelley Jofre

The Truth about Pills and Pregnancy
Watch The Truth about Pills and Pregnancy with @BBCPanorama – Reporter @ShelleyJofre

Many women have to take medicines while pregnant. But could they be risking the health of their unborn child? Decades after the Thalidomide scandal shocked the world, Panorama reveals how another medicine has damaged far more children. Drugs cannot be tested on pregnant women for ethical reasons, so doctors do not know if most prescription drugs are safe for the unborn child, and the system set up to monitor side-effects appears to be flawed. As evidence emerges that some common antidepressants are linked to heart defects in babies, the programme asks how much we really know about the safety of medicines women take while pregnant.

On YouYube

Watch “The Truth about Pills and Pregnancy” video on YouTube

Broadcasts

  • On BBC One, Monday 1 Jul 2013 at 20:30.
  • On BBC News Channel, Thursday 4 Jul 2013 at 04:30.
  • On BBC Two, Friday 5 Jul 2013 at 00:20.
  • Reporter: Shelley Jofre.

Let’s see if the BBC mentions DES following the 2012 DES UK Media Coverage. Find out more about DES exposure and the long-term health effects associated with prenatal exposure to DES drug.

More DES DiEthylStilbestrol Resources

Lessons must be learned

Pips breast implant scandal: Regulator warned years earlier.

A Health Minister review saying that “Lessons must be learned” … I’ve heard that before yet lessons are not learned and history is repeating itself over, and over again …

Read Pips breast implant scandal: Regulator warned years earlier.
The Telegraph, 15 May 2012.

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